Now Sol's Samsung is worthless
Drypoint
2014
30 x 21cm

Sam Hodge

Sam Hodge (b.1963, Kent, UK) studied Natural Sciences BA, Cambridge University, UK (1981-84) and Painting Conservation Post Graduate Diploma, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London, UK (1985-88). Selected Group exhibitions: A Lot of Things Have Happened, Malaspina Printmakers, Vancouver, Canada (2016); Summer Exhibition, Royal Academy, London (2015) and Hack the Barbican, Barbican, London (2013). Solo shows include: A Catalogue of Misfortune, Gallery Space, Roz Barr Architects, London (2015); Repetition and Difference, Chisenhale Art Place, London (2013) and By Accident and Design, Ada Street Gallery, London (2009). Prizes include: Lawrence King Prize, East London Printmakers Summer Show (2015); shortlisted for Griffin Painting Prize (2015) and shortlisted for Creekside Open Prize, selected by Richard Deacon (2015). She lives and works in London.

Hodge is a painter and printmaker with a background in Natural Science and Painting Conservation, making work that deals with materials and how they fall apart and decay, creating newly emergent forms. She says, “I am interested in processes such as erosion and fracture and how complex and unpredictable patterns emerge from simple physical process. But I am also concerned with human interaction with these material processes. How we intervene; selecting, collecting and making sense of the products of chance process, giving value to the selected and making connections that imbue the ambiguous with meaning.”

This series of prints are of smashed mobile screens. 21st Century technological mishaps have been transformed into delicate web-like prints using the traditional technique of drypoint. The process of drawing focuses loving attention on the results of a moment of destructive force, while the transformation into print allows an appreciation of the variety, beauty and complexity of the crack patterns that have emerged, encouraging connections with the history of representation of natural forms, particularly scientific illustrations.

A collection of 39 of these prints together with the stories of how they got broken has been reproduced in an artist’s book: ‘A Catalogue of Misfortune’.

 

You can see Sam Hodge's work at Northern Print


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